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John Locke quotes (22)

I have always thought the actions of men are the best interpreters of their thoughts.
John Locke   Category: Action

All men are liable to error and most men are in many points by passion or interest under temptation to it.
John Locke   Category: Error

The improvement of the understanding is for two ends: first for our own increase of knowledge; secondly to enable us to deliver and make out that knowledge to others.
John Locke   Category: Knowledge

We should have a great many fewer disputes in the world if only words were taken for what they are the signs of our ideas only and not for things themselves.
John Locke   Category: Word

A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.
John Locke   Category: Health

Good and evil reward and punishment are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work and guided.
John Locke   Category: Evil

No mans knowledge here can go beyond his experience.
John Locke   Category: Experience

Whenever the legislators endeavor to take away and destroy the property of the people or to reduce them to slavery under arbitrary power they put themselves into a state of war with the people who are thereupon absolved from any farther obedience and are left to the common refuge which God hath provided for all men against force and violence.
John Locke   Category: Revolution

If punishment makes not the will supple it hardens the offender.
John Locke   Category: Punish

Wherever Law ends Tyranny begins.
John Locke   Category: Law

New opinions are always suspected and usually opposed without any other reason but because they are not already common.
John Locke   Category: Opinion

Reverie is when ideas float in our mind without reflection or regard of the understanding.
John Locke   Category: Quiet

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.
John Locke   Category: World

That which is static and repetitive is boring. That which is dynamic and random is confusing. In between lies art.
John Locke   Category: Art

Every man has a property in his own person; this nobody has a right to but himself.
John Locke   Category: Risk

It is one thing to show a man that he is in an error and another to put him in possession of truth.
John Locke   Category: Truth

Virtue is harder to be got than knowledge of the world; and it lost in a young man is seldom recovered.
John Locke   Category: Unsorted

The thoughts that come often unsought and as it were drop into the mind are commonly the most valuable of any we have and therefore should be secured because they seldom return again.
John Locke   Category: Thief

The reason why men enter into society is the preservation of their property.
John Locke   Category: Society

Parents wonder why the streams are bitter when they themselves have poisoned the fountain.
John Locke   Category: Parents

Religion which should most distinguish us from beasts and ought most peculiarly to elevate us as rational creatures above brutes is that wherein men often appear most irrational and more senseless than beasts themselves.
John Locke   Category: Religion

Probability is a kind of penance which God made suitable I presume to that state of mediocrity and probationership he has been pleased to place us in here; wherein to check our over-confidence and presumption we might by every days experience be made sensible of our short-sightedness and liableness to error.
John Locke   Category: Probability